Welcome

The Sesame Satellite Blog
Satellite Television Decoded Some 50 years ago, streaming television pictures from one side of the world to another was a distant dream. Viewers of early television had to wait for hours, even days, to get a glimpse of footages taken from other parts of the globe. But telecommunications technology has evolved tremendously through the years. Real-time, high-definition television pictures are beamed into millions of homes across the globe through different modes – broadcast television, cable television, satellite television, and others. The advent of digital technology has brought out even more innovations that make television viewing more accessible and enjoyable for viewers. Much has changed since the first live transatlantic video was beamed by Telstar in July of 1962. This historic event marked the birth of the age of satellite television and revolutionized popular entertainment. But while we enjoy this technology, not many actually know how these television technologies work and differ. Broadcast TV vs satellite TV Basically, satellite television works just like broadcast (also called terrestrial) television. But unlike broadcast television that sends radio signal through high-power antennae, satellite television makes use of geostationary satellites that orbit some 22,000 kilometers above the earth. These satellites send out radio waves to transmit television programming directly into viewer’s house. Satellite TV technology reduces the interference common in broadcast television that results in poor resolution. Moreover, data is compressed into digital file formats that allow greatest amount of data in a given bandwidth thus results in better data transmission. Satellite can transmit data in different frequency ranges: Ku Band, C Band and Ka Band. Satellite TV vs cable TV Satellite television is a better alternative compared to cable television, as it delivers a good number of HD and digital channels plus programs that are the same or even better than those offered by cable providers. You only need to have the proper equipment to stream the satellite programming. This means you can use this technology even in rural areas. And probably the most important thing about satellite TV is that it is more economical. Considering the costs of cable subscriptions, it’s not surprising to find more and more viewers opting for satellite TV. Get connected to the satellite In order to receive radio waves sent by the satellite, you need to have a satellite dish. A satellite dish is basically an antenna designed to receive specific type of radio signal. The smaller dishes commonly seen today pick up Ku and Ka band, while the large dishes in early satellite TV use large dishes. Radio waves are converted into lower frequency through a device known as LNB (Low Noise Block Converter) or LNC (Low Noise Converter). It then transmits the signal to the tuner of the satellite receiver. The data is then translated by the tuner into audio and video for display on your television. It is through this complex data transmission that you are able to get your favorite channels. So the next time you sit around and enjoy your favorite TV show, you now have a better idea about how satellite TV systems really work.

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Latest Satellite TV News Los Angeles Times: Cable, satellite TV viewers need greater access to set-top boxes Los Angeles Times Dish, Fox News reach new deal, ending weeks-long blackout CNet.com British youngsters are being radicalised by hate-filled sermons broadcast live on satellite TV, ministers warned DailyMail.com TV channels delivered by Internet, new TV sets DailyHerald.com
Satellite TV Resources Here’s in depth information on satellite TV from Wikipedia Satellite Television Here’s an in depth review of DirecTV satellite TV service Directv Review Online Here’s an in depth review of Sirius XM satellite radio service Sirius XM Radio Review Here’s an in depth review of Dish satellite TV service Dish Network Review Online
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Welcome

The Sesame Satellite Blog
Satellite Television Decoded Some 50 years ago, streaming television pictures from one side of the world to another was a distant dream. Viewers of early television had to wait for hours, even days, to get a glimpse of footages taken from other parts of the globe. But telecommunications technology has evolved tremendously through the years. Real-time, high- definition television pictures are beamed into millions of homes across the globe through different modes – broadcast television, cable television, satellite television, and others. The advent of digital technology has brought out even more innovations that make television viewing more accessible and enjoyable for viewers. Much has changed since the first live transatlantic video was beamed by Telstar in July of 1962. This historic event marked the birth of the age of satellite television and revolutionized popular entertainment. But while we enjoy this technology, not many actually know how these television technologies work and differ. Broadcast TV vs satellite TV Basically, satellite television works just like broadcast (also called terrestrial) television. But unlike broadcast television that sends radio signal through high-power antennae, satellite television makes use of geostationary satellites that orbit some 22,000 kilometers above the earth. These satellites send out radio waves to transmit television programming directly into viewer’s house. Satellite TV technology reduces the interference common in broadcast television that results in poor resolution. Moreover, data is compressed into digital file formats that allow greatest amount of data in a given bandwidth thus results in better data transmission. Satellite can transmit data in different frequency ranges: Ku Band, C Band and Ka Band. Satellite TV vs cable TV Satellite television is a better alternative compared to cable television, as it delivers a good number of HD and digital channels plus programs that are the same or even better than those offered by cable providers. You only need to have the proper equipment to stream the satellite programming. This means you can use this technology even in rural areas. And probably the most important thing about satellite TV is that it is more economical. Considering the costs of cable subscriptions, it’s not surprising to find more and more viewers opting for satellite TV. Get connected to the satellite In order to receive radio waves sent by the satellite, you need to have a satellite dish. A satellite dish is basically an antenna designed to receive specific type of radio signal. The smaller dishes commonly seen today pick up Ku and Ka band, while the large dishes in early satellite TV use large dishes. Radio waves are converted into lower frequency through a device known as LNB (Low Noise Block Converter) or LNC (Low Noise Converter). It then transmits the signal to the tuner of the satellite receiver. The data is then translated by the tuner into audio and video for display on your television. It is through this complex data transmission that you are able to get your favorite channels. So the next time you sit around and enjoy your favorite TV show, you now have a better idea about how satellite TV systems really work.

© 2012 The Sesame Satellite Blog